classical

For All Ages

For All Ages

For All Ages

Since its invention in the eighteenth century, the string quartet has proved one of the most resilient forms, continuously reinvented and repurposed for changing times.

Published on 20 April 2012

Peter Rosser (1970–2014) was a composer, writer and music lecturer.

He was born in London and moved to Belfast in 1990, where he studied composition at the University of Ulster and was awarded a DPhil in 1997. His music has been performed at the Spitalfields Festival in London, the Belfast Festival at Queen’s and by the Crash Ensemble in Dublin.

In 2011 the Arts Council acknowledged his contribution to the arts in Northern Ireland through a Major Individual Artist Award. He used this award to write his Second String Quartet, which was premiered in 2012 by the JACK Quartet at the opening concert at Belfast's new Metropolitan Arts Centre (The MAC).

Peter Rosser also wrote extensively on a wide range of music genres, with essays published in The Wire, Perspectives of New Music and the Crescent Journal. 

He died following an illness on 24 November 2014, aged 44.

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra to perform in Waterford

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra to perform in Waterford

RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra to perform in Waterford

Principal Conductor Alan Buribayev will make his debut outside Dublin with the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra, in a concert at the WIT College Street Chapel in Waterford on 23 February at 8pm.

Published on 9 February 2012

Stephen Graham is an editor at www.musicalcriticism.com and blogs at www.robotsdancingalone.wordpress.com

Resurgam Celebrate Giovani Gabrieli in Dublin

Resurgam Celebrate Giovani Gabrieli in Dublin

Resurgam Celebrate Giovani Gabrieli in Dublin

Stephen Graham rounds up classical news, including Resurgam celebrating Gabrieli, an exciting line-up for MaerzMusik 2012 in Berlin, Cara O'Sullivan in Sligo, the first EPTA Piano Festival and Concorde at the Contemporary Music Centre.

Published on 23 January 2012

Stephen Graham is an editor at www.musicalcriticism.com and blogs at www.robotsdancingalone.wordpress.com

Quiet Music Ensemble Celebrate John Cage in Cork

Quiet Music Ensemble Celebrate John Cage in Cork

Quiet Music Ensemble Celebrate John Cage in Cork

Stephen Graham's classical music news, including live opera from New York, the Quiet Music Ensemble celebrating John Cage, Linda Buckley performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Irish Composers' Collective and a John Kinsella

Published on 14 January 2012

Stephen Graham is an editor at www.musicalcriticism.com and blogs at www.robotsdancingalone.wordpress.com

Without a Core Tradition

Without a Core Tradition

Without a Core Tradition

Three recent recordings of twentieth and twenty-first century Irish orchestral composition reveal a persistent ambition to fuse an Irish musical heritage with European styles of composition.

Published on 9 January 2012

Stephen Graham is an editor at www.musicalcriticism.com and blogs at www.robotsdancingalone.wordpress.com

Mahler Everywhere

Mahler Everywhere

Mahler Everywhere

Was Gustav Mahler the most influential composer of the last 150 years? Two recent books by the journalist and broadcaster Norman Lebrecht claim as much; George Rafael, though, feels the question of Mahler's influence is more personal.

Published on 1 November 2011

George Rafael is a writer on film and music based in London. He has contributed to Cineaste, The First Post, Opera News, Film Comment and Salon.

Play it Again

Play it Again

Play it Again

Were Arnold Schoenberg's American years really spent in frustration, poverty and obscurity?

Published on 1 February 2011

Sabine Feisst is Associate Professor of Music History and Literature at Arizona State University. She is the author of the book, Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press).

Empty Space

Empty Space

Empty Space

Commissioned to compose a work in response to 9/11, John Adams confronted the question: can modern classical music still be the transcendental force we need it to be? by Barra Ó Séaghdha

Published on 1 August 2010

Barra Ó Séaghdha is a writer on cultural politics, literature and music and was previously co-editor of Graph cultural review

Sensuality Matters

Sensuality Matters

Sensuality Matters

There is a long line of theories claiming that we have reached the end of art, but they are forgetting something, writes Joanna Demers

Published on 1 June 2010

Joanna Demers is Associate Professor of Musicology at the Thornton School of Music, University of Southern California. She is the author of Listening Through the Noise: The Aesthetics of Experimental Electronic Music, to be published by Oxford University Press in July.

That Was Me

That Was Me

That Was Me

The author of A Clockwork Orange may have been better known as a novelist, but Anthony Burgess was also a prolific composer whose music is only now being explored.

Published on 1 June 2010

Paul Phillips, Senior Lecturer in Music at Brown University, Rhode Island, is author of A Clockwork Counterpoint: The Music and Literature of Anthony Burgess. An award-winning conductor, composer and pianist, he has spearheaded efforts to make Burgess’ music more widely known, conducting the world premieres of Concerto for Pianoforte and Orchestra, Song for Saint Cecilia’s Day and A Manchester Overture.

A Long Drive from Limavady

A Long Drive from Limavady

A Long Drive from Limavady

The melody of ‘Danny Boy’ has its origins in the middle of the nineteenth century in the North of Ireland. An old harper’s melody was collected and embellished to make the air that we know today, but by who?

Published on 1 June 2010

Brendan Drummond is a former teacher and writer on music education. He is currently a music examiner for Trinity Guildhall, London.

Beyond Murder

Beyond Murder

Beyond Murder

A new book on the composer Carlo Gesualdo shows that he was centuries ahead of his time, writes Raymond Deane.

Published on 1 April 2010

Raymond Deane is a composer, pianist, novelist, essayist and political activist (a founding member and former chairperson of the Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign). He is a member of Aosdána.

Composing by Numbers

Composing by Numbers

Composing by Numbers

People plus music: it’s a simple formula for compelling television programmes, but why does screening creativity in music defeat even the most imaginative producers and directors, asks Christopher Fox.

Published on 1 December 2009

Viol, Fiddle, Violin

Viol, Fiddle, Violin

Viol, Fiddle, Violin

How can musicians that are so eminent in their own genre fail to understand the conventions of another?

Published on 1 December 2009

Ciaran Carson is a poet, prose writer, translator and flute-player, and the author of Last Night’s Fun, a book about Irish traditional music. He is is Professor of Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast.

A Missionary Spirit

A Missionary Spirit

A Missionary Spirit

In an extract from his forthcoming biography of Irish Times music critic Charles Acton (1914–1999), Richard Pine discusses the role of the critic from the 1950s up to the 1980s.

Published on 1 August 2009

Richard Pine, Director of the Durrell School of Corfu, is a former Concerts Manager in RTÉ. He is the author and editor of books on Irish music history and of definitive studies of Oscar Wilde, Brian Friel and Lawrence Durrell.

Live: West Cork Chamber Music Festival: Trio Mediaeval

Live: West Cork Chamber Music Festival: Trio Mediaeval

Anna Maria Friman, Linn Andrea Fuglseth, Torunn Østrem Ossum (sopranos), Arve Henriksen (trumpet) St Brendan’s Church, Bantry, Co. Cork1 July 2009I got spectacularly lost on the long drive down to Bantry.

Published on 1 August 2009

Benedict Schlepper-Connolly is a composer and a director of Ergodos, a production company and record label. He is Editor of The Journal of Music. schlepperconnolly.com

Francesco Turrisi

Francesco Turrisi

Si Dolce è il TormentoDiatribe DIACD003Francesco Turrisi is an Italian pianist, accordionist and percussionist who has been brightening the Irish jazz scene with his unique blend of influences since moving to Dublin three years ago.

Published on 1 June 2009

Kevin Stevens is is a Dublin-based novelist and writer on history, literature, and jazz.

Bare Ruin'd Choirs

Bare Ruin'd Choirs

Bare Ruin'd Choirs

A crisis of identity in choral music is leaving it professionally sidelined and with little status in society

Published on 1 June 2009

Paul Hilier is a baritone and a choral conductor. He is currently Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the National Chamber Choir of Ireland.

Oddbox

Oddbox

Oddbox

The first in a series of curious anecdotes from musical history.

Published on 1 June 2009

Barra Ó Séaghdha is a writer on cultural politics, literature and music and was previously co-editor of Graph cultural review

Mantra

Mantra

Mantra

Kuljit Bhamra, Shahid Khan, the Orlando Consort and Jonathan Mayer Described as ‘musical conversations across the Indian Ocean’, Mantra is a new work cultivated by the National Centre for Early Music (York) which combines sixteenth-century

Published on 1 June 2009

The Art of Inefficiency

The Art of Inefficiency

The Art of Inefficiency

Peter Rosser on the intimacy and ritual of live music

Published on 1 April 2009

Peter Rosser (1970–2014) was a composer, writer and music lecturer.

He was born in London and moved to Belfast in 1990, where he studied composition at the University of Ulster and was awarded a DPhil in 1997. His music has been performed at the Spitalfields Festival in London, the Belfast Festival at Queen’s and by the Crash Ensemble in Dublin.

In 2011 the Arts Council acknowledged his contribution to the arts in Northern Ireland through a Major Individual Artist Award. He used this award to write his Second String Quartet, which was premiered in 2012 by the JACK Quartet at the opening concert at Belfast's new Metropolitan Arts Centre (The MAC).

Peter Rosser also wrote extensively on a wide range of music genres, with essays published in The Wire, Perspectives of New Music and the Crescent Journal. 

He died following an illness on 24 November 2014, aged 44.

Recorded: The NMC Songbook

Recorded: The NMC Songbook

Recorded: The NMC Songbook

Various artistsThe NMC SongbookNMC D150For a label that was set up with the decidedly recherché aim of celebrating contemporary British music (an aspiration whose reach was happily extended to encompass living Irish composers) and whose nam

Published on 1 April 2009

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

Notes

Notes

Notes

Unlocking the Archive / Session with the Pipers /Music Recording / Casadh Arís / Temple Bar Trad / Música Nueva de Mexico / Outof Time / New Books on Music in Ireland / Winteriser / Happy to Meet, Sorry toPart / Dublin Philharmonic in USA /

Published on 1 January 2009

CD Reviews: Balfe

CD Reviews: Balfe

CD Reviews: Balfe

Shakespeare’s vainglorious corpulent knight Falstaff has proved an irresistible lure to composers over the centuries. Salieri, Mozart, Elgar, Holst, Vaughan Williams and, most memorably, Verdi, have all set the...

Published on 1 January 2009

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

A Lament for Arthur O'Leary

A Lament for Arthur O'Leary

A Lament for Arthur O'Leary

The first composition teacher of Charles Villiers Stanford, the ‘father’ of the renaissance in English classical music, came from Tralee.

Published on 1 January 2009

Raymond Deane is a composer, pianist, novelist, essayist and political activist (a founding member and former chairperson of the Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign). He is a member of Aosdána.

Open House

Open House

Open House

'Access' is now a guiding principle across music and the arts, but what does it mean in practice?

Published on 1 January 2009

Peter Rosser (1970–2014) was a composer, writer and music lecturer.

He was born in London and moved to Belfast in 1990, where he studied composition at the University of Ulster and was awarded a DPhil in 1997. His music has been performed at the Spitalfields Festival in London, the Belfast Festival at Queen’s and by the Crash Ensemble in Dublin.

In 2011 the Arts Council acknowledged his contribution to the arts in Northern Ireland through a Major Individual Artist Award. He used this award to write his Second String Quartet, which was premiered in 2012 by the JACK Quartet at the opening concert at Belfast's new Metropolitan Arts Centre (The MAC).

Peter Rosser also wrote extensively on a wide range of music genres, with essays published in The Wire, Perspectives of New Music and the Crescent Journal. 

He died following an illness on 24 November 2014, aged 44.

Notes

Notes

Notes

Gig GuideMany readers will be aware that JMI sends out a bulletin and gig guide email every Monday. The email features nationwide event listings, the latest news from the music world and frequent competitions for tickets and CDs.

Published on 1 November 2008

CD Reviews: Clíona Doris

CD Reviews: Clíona Doris

CD Reviews: Clíona Doris

A Pale Yellow SkyRTÉ lyric fm CD115It is difficult to call to mind another concert harpist of the calibre of County Down’s Clíona Doris who has the imagination to think differently about an instrument perhaps best known by audiences...

Published on 1 November 2008

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

CD Reviews: Ensemble Avalon

CD Reviews: Ensemble Avalon

CD Reviews: Ensemble Avalon

Bax, Bernstein and BeethovenRTÉ lyric fm CD116Only one of the traditional ‘Three Bs’ features on the debut offering from the ensemble avalon, but so persuasive is this coupling of Beethoven with Arnold Bax and Leonard Bernstein that...

Published on 1 November 2008

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

Turn it Up: John Kelly

Turn it Up: John Kelly

Turn it Up: John Kelly

For over a decade, John Kelly has been broadcasting his own distinct mix of music on national radio, first with the BBC, then Eclectic Ballroom on Radio Ireland (now Today FM) and Mystery Train on RTÉ Radio 1, establishing a reputation as a

Published on 1 November 2008

Toner Quinn is founder and publisher of The Journal of Music. www.tonerquinn.com

Notes

Notes

Notes

Islands Tour; The Reel Deal; The West Awake; Free State IV; Globalising Irish Music – Podcast by Bill Whelan; DEAF; Creative Spaces; Béal Tuinne and Conal Ó Gráda at the Cork Folk Festival; Eliza Carthy in Enniskillen; Seán Ó Riada Memorial

Published on 1 September 2008

Live Reviews: National Chamber Choir

Live Reviews: National Chamber Choir

National Chamber Choir, Paul Hillier (conductor)Harty Room, Queen’s University, Belfast11 June 2008Faced routinely with the deepest sentiments, sacred and profane, where do singers position themselves emotionally?

Published on 1 September 2008

Peter Rosser (1970–2014) was a composer, writer and music lecturer.

He was born in London and moved to Belfast in 1990, where he studied composition at the University of Ulster and was awarded a DPhil in 1997. His music has been performed at the Spitalfields Festival in London, the Belfast Festival at Queen’s and by the Crash Ensemble in Dublin.

In 2011 the Arts Council acknowledged his contribution to the arts in Northern Ireland through a Major Individual Artist Award. He used this award to write his Second String Quartet, which was premiered in 2012 by the JACK Quartet at the opening concert at Belfast's new Metropolitan Arts Centre (The MAC).

Peter Rosser also wrote extensively on a wide range of music genres, with essays published in The Wire, Perspectives of New Music and the Crescent Journal. 

He died following an illness on 24 November 2014, aged 44.

CD Reviews: Bill Whelan

CD Reviews: Bill Whelan

CD Reviews: Bill Whelan

The Connemara SuiteCloonisle Records TARACD 4021In the last issue of JMI, Bill Whelan spoke candidly about the vertiginous experience of finding himself at the centre of Riverdance, the interval-filling distraction turned international phen

Published on 1 September 2008

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

The Bohemian Life

The Bohemian Life

The Bohemian Life

Bernadette Greevy reads a new book on nineteenth-century Irish-born composer, Michael Balfe.

Published on 1 July 2008

Bernadette Greevy (1940–2008) was an international classical singer who performed on all five continents with great success and was Founder/Artistic Director of the Anna Livia Dublin International Opera Festival.

CD Reviews: Canty

CD Reviews: Canty

CD Reviews: Canty

Apostle of IrelandDivine Art DDA25065Celebrating their tenth anniversary this year, Canty, Scotland’s only professional group dedicated to the performance of medieval music, turns its attention towards Ireland and specifically to Irish plai

Published on 1 May 2008

Michael Quinn is a freelance music and theatre journalist based in Co. Down.

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